Art Cart NYC™

truck-yeah:

Anonymous Shop joins Truck Yeah™ at Bushwick Open Studios

We’re very excited to have Anonymous Shop take part in Truck Yeah™ at Bushwick Open studios!

Started by Anonymous Gallery, the 1964 Airstream Tradewind serves as a mobile multi-media shop, traveling to art fairs, exhibitions, festivals and museums across the country. The content of the shop will be curated by Anonymous Gallery and selected guest curators, artists, and designers. Be sure to keep up with the Anonymous Shop  after BOS 2012, as they’ll teaming up with the sunglasses company, The Monocle Order in Summer 2012. 

To learn more, visit the Anonymous Gallery site here.

Anonymous Shop on facebook.

Follow @anonymousartnyc on twitter.

If a Person Quits Social Media, Does She Still Exist?

An Interview with Defaced’s Allie Pohl

By Art Cart NYC Contributor Kelsey Tyler

Multi-media artist Allie Pohl may be best known for her Ideal Woman series, but the breadth of her work explores cultural phenomena as they happen: extreme body enhancement, current hair removal trends, and most recently, social media personas. Art Cart NYC will present Pohl’s exhibition Defaced at Truck Yeah, Bushwick Open Studios, June1-2.

Defaced welcomes ongoing, anonymous, and open participation in a discussion about how they really think and feel while using social media. The project will reveal the socially unacceptable comments individuals restrain from writing. By considering questions such as, “What makes something Facebook-worthy?” Defaced sheds light on the “how and why”;  the sentiments behind the social media user experience. In a digital age in which the lines between the physical and online worlds are blurred, one’s perspective can be difficult to maintain. Defaced will explore this rapidly changing landscape.

*****

What is the story behind Ideal Woman?

"Ideal Woman" is a concept reflecting society’s obsession with perfection. I created a symbol by digitally transforming and enhancing the American cultural icon, Barbie, to the socially constructed ideal of 36-24-36, forcing viewers to be aware of the unattainable nature of the “cookie cutter” form pervading Western culture. The symbol, serves as an avatar, which is repeated throughout my work.

As a way to appropriate this concept into pop culture, I created the Ideal Woman: Necklace. The necklaces are agents for change; to question the social constructs of perfection. I partnered with the organization, Daybreak, a Los Angeles based women’s charity that is a project of OPCC, a 501(c) non-profit organization. Daybreak empowers women recovering from mental illness and homelessness to rebuild their lives. The women of Daybreak and I work together assembling the necklaces as part of the rehabilitation process. A portion of the proceeds are donated back to the center.

It seems like Defaced is questioning similar ideas/ideals. Do you see these two projects as connected?

This project is a continuation and is absolutely related to my previous work. Technology has altered the way we receive and perceive beauty and the way we communicate and perceive communication. I am driven by the same goal:  holding up a mirror to society.

Have you been surprised by anything thus far in the Defaced project? Any unexpected outcomes?  Do you edit the comments at all before you post them?

As we continue to grow as a technology-prevalent society we have to address how technology has and continues to change the way we receive and perceive information.

I have not really been surprised by any comments thus far. Some comments have been thought provoking while others have been funny. I would never edit someone’s comments; I created this space for people to freely write how they think and feel; to create a dialogue.

One of the comments, “I share, therefore I am,” was particularly funny and befitting. It also uses that twitter/meme formula of appropriating something we’re familiar with, in this case, a Descartes quote, and tweaking it to make a Social Media Truism that makes us smirk and nod.

That is one of my personal favorites.

I think it is really important to “self-reflect” while using social media. 

Social media really allows for reflection. And hyper-reflection, at that. Moments after <big event>, we respond together in real time. But perhaps the revelatory aspect of creating distance from <big event> through time is compromised.

Most people I know, myself included, have a complicated relationship with social media. They see it as a tool for so many valuable things: sustaining relationships with friends, generating publicity for work and personal projects. But everyone seems to have an opinion on what is and what is not social media-worthy. Those participating in Defaced often share their views on this. Have you gleaned any insight on what people value or don’t value to this end?

There is always the good and the bad with everything and it is important to try to find a healthy balance; the ying/yang theory. Social media has a lot of positive and, therefore, in return, negative attributes.

Defaced was launched last week, so it is fairly new. What I have gathered, thus far, is that a lot of people feel guilty and therefore reluctant about visiting their “ex’s”. I think guilt can be one of our most dangerous feelings. No one cares or wants to see a million pictures of babies or cats. People use the Facebook platform to share and reveal different types of information, whether it is important or irrelevant. People really like documenting events as opposed to just participating in them.

They do! And is documenting becoming a participatory action in and of itself now?!

I think it is about what actually drives us to document. Is it because we want to show everyone what we are doing by posting it on Facebook and Twitter? Then does that connect us with other people or friends because we could possibly meet up or know through digital communication that we have shared the same experience? But why do people feel the need to be on their devices if we are with other people participating or experiencing an event with physical interaction? Live in the present.

Yes. It’s like a degree of separation exists even though we are participating in an experience in real life. I always think of that when I’m at a concert and someone is recording video on his or her smartphone. They’re experiencing the whole performance on their 4x2 inch screen when the life-size version is mere feet in front of them.

Absolutely.

I have a friend who found out his girlfriend was really into those Alternate Reality video games about a year into their relationship. He broke it off because he saw the whole thing as a mechanism to escape reality that was too strange for him to deal with. But this made me think: which can boast a truer representation of self?

Yes and who’s to say which representation of an individual’s self is more true.  I think we all have alter egos which are released in different ways. But, there is the physical reality and the digitally constructed reality. If someone is more comfortable in a digitally constructed world where they are able to create their own idea of themselves and control their form of communication, then more power to them, but that is not the physical world where there is no “signing out.”  

I’m going to switch gears. There is this social media site called Dirty Bubble that’s penned as “Rate my Professor meets Yelp” for dating. People you date review you on everything from appearance to sanity to personal hygiene BY STARS !! Can you imagine? Do you think this is a way of solving the “true online persona” question (in the most painful way possible)? Am I wrong to see this as completely masochistic?

That is really terrible. It is just another form of on-line bullying.

Last year, I created a gallery installation focusing on the most commonly used words in online dating sites.   My installation was called Mirror, mirror.  I guess we are in a time where people feel more comfortable behind the screen and often times camouflaging who they are.   

*****

The following questions were first posed by anonymous commenters to the Defaced project. Allie was kind enough to answer them when re-posed here by Art Cart. 

Have you Google stalked before a first date?

Yes

How many photos of friends standing in a row is too many?

Hahaha. I don’t know. But I think we can get the point with a few. I am a minimalist!

Have you ever posted music lyrics as a status update on Facebook or twitter?

Maybe on twitter…

Where’s the “Dislike” button on Facebook?

Where is it?!

Does anyone have as much fun in real life as they seem to be having on Facebook?

 It is the viewer’s perception of the individuals “fun.”

Is anything unique anymore?

Re-contextualizing.

Does the internet make people lonely or are lonely people more attracted to the internet?

This is a quote someone posted from a SherryTurkle article in the NY Times. I really loved her article. Stephen Marche for The Atlantic wrote another great one.

VERY last question (this one, mine): what will become on Defaced after Bushwick Open Studios? Will you keep the project open for ongoing submissions?

Yes. The site will remain open for comments. Who knows what other project and ideas will come from this

*****

To participate, visit www.defacedproject.com.

To view the project twitter feed here.

All posts are anonymous.

For more on Allie Pohl’s work, to contact the artist, or to purchase Ideal Woman merchandise, visit www.alliepohl.com.

Art Cart Contributor Kelsey Tyler

Meet Kelsey, Art Cart’s newest web contributor! She’ll be posting about all the Truck Yeah participants leading up to Bushwick Open Studios on June 1st. Keep an eye out for her interview with Allie Pohl next week.

In NYC but hailing from Kansas, Kelsey is a Master’s candidate in Art History at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Her past professional experiences include internships at the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, the Corcoran Gallery of Art, and Christie’s Auction House. She currently assists with business operations at Americanflat, an online art gallery and consultancy organization. Her editorial contributions for Art Cart center on alternative art spaces in and around the city. Seen any great art outside of the Institutional Four Walls that Art Cart should cover? Send Kelsey a tip via twitter

Allie Pohl&#8217;s project for Truck Yeah™ at Bushwick Open Studios is live! 
Defaced asks individuals to express what they are really thinking about when using social media websites. 
Comments entered anonymously through the dedicated website will stream online. During the event from June 1-3, the comments will run across LED panels mounted to the Art Cart.
The project reveals the socially unacceptable comments everyone restrains from writing. By asking people to consider questions such as, &#8220;what makes something facebook-worthy?&#8221; Defaced sheds light on the &#8220;how and why,&#8221; the sentiments behind the social media user experience.
Pohl believes that in a digital age in which the lines between the physical and online worlds are blurred, one&#8217;s perspective is hard to maintain. She aims to push individuals to be aware of their intentions and behavior while looking at these virtual curated spaces, where everyone&#8217;s ideal figure or persona is put forth. 
For the complete statement, click here.
To contribute, visit the website.
Follow the live stream by liking the project on facebook and twitter. 
Remember, all comments are anonymous, so join the conversation!

Allie Pohl’s project for Truck Yeah™ at Bushwick Open Studios is live! 

Defaced asks individuals to express what they are really thinking about when using social media websites. 

Comments entered anonymously through the dedicated website will stream online. During the event from June 1-3, the comments will run across LED panels mounted to the Art Cart.

The project reveals the socially unacceptable comments everyone restrains from writing. By asking people to consider questions such as, “what makes something facebook-worthy?” Defaced sheds light on the “how and why,” the sentiments behind the social media user experience.

Pohl believes that in a digital age in which the lines between the physical and online worlds are blurred, one’s perspective is hard to maintain. She aims to push individuals to be aware of their intentions and behavior while looking at these virtual curated spaces, where everyone’s ideal figure or persona is put forth. 

For the complete statement, click here.

To contribute, visit the website.

Follow the live stream by liking the project on facebook and twitter

Remember, all comments are anonymous, so join the conversation!

Art Cart NYC™ and Etta Place Present Truck Yeah™: A Mobile Meet Up at Pine Box Rock Shop during Bushwick Open Studios and Art Festival, June 1st-2nd, 2012.
Art Cart NYC™ and Etta Place are proud to announce their second Truck Yeah™: A Mobile Meet Up event, taking place June 1st and 2nd, 2012 as part of Bushwick Open Studios. Truck Yeah™ will bringtogether fourteen organizations to celebrate Brooklyn’s mobile arts and culture at Pine Box Rock Shop on 12 Grattan Street. Pine Box will host a Truck Yeah™ happy hour from 4-8&#160;pm on Friday June 1st. The event will resume on Saturday from 2-8&#160;pm. Truck Yeah™ envisions the urban center as an ever- changing backdrop from which mobile culture emerges to create an energetic and colorful metropolis.
Click HERE to read the full press release!
Truck Yeah™ participants include:
Anonymous Gallery
Art Cart NYC™ presenting Allie Pohl
Bang On! NYC 
Brooke David
Brooklyn Art Library 
Coolhaus Ice Cream Sandwiches
El Camino ARTRV featuring B. Thom Stevenson
Gorilla Cheese NYC
Green Pirate Juice Truck
S&#8217;amore NYC
Sherry Truck
Shorty&#8217;s On Wheels
Submergedart
Tiffany Nicole Mobile Vintage Shop
Bushwick Open Studios is an open and inclusive event that celebrates this thriving neighborhood by sharing artistic projects and encouraging community interaction and dialogue. BOS brings the neighborhood’s thousands of artists and performers out into the streets and in view of each other, other community residents, and the general public.
Located in an old casket factory steps from the Morgan Ave L, Pine Box Rock Shop offers 16 drafts and impressive specialty drinks, along with a seasonal cocktail menu. In the heart of Bushwick&#8217;s arts community, Pine Box hosts many emerging artists, musicians, filmmakers and comedians. Visit the website for monthly events and show times. Weekly Staples: Happy Hour (everyday until 8pm), Trivia Night (Wednesdays @ 8:30), Karaoke (Thursdays @ 10pm), and Televised Events. (Open at 4pm weekdays, 2pm Sat/ Sun.)

Art Cart NYC™ and Etta Place Present Truck Yeah: A Mobile Meet Up at Pine Box Rock Shop during Bushwick Open Studios and Art Festival, June 1st-2nd, 2012.

Art Cart NYC™ and Etta Place are proud to announce their second Truck Yeah™: A Mobile Meet Up event, taking place June 1st and 2nd, 2012 as part of Bushwick Open Studios. Truck Yeah™ will bringtogether fourteen organizations to celebrate Brooklyn’s mobile arts and culture at Pine Box Rock Shop on 12 Grattan Street. Pine Box will host a Truck Yeah™ happy hour from 4-8 pm on Friday June 1st. The event will resume on Saturday from 2-8 pm. Truck Yeah™ envisions the urban center as an ever- changing backdrop from which mobile culture emerges to create an energetic and colorful metropolis.

Click HERE to read the full press release!

Truck Yeah™ participants include:

Anonymous Gallery

Art Cart NYC™ presenting Allie Pohl

Bang On! NYC 

Brooke David

Brooklyn Art Library 

Coolhaus Ice Cream Sandwiches

El Camino ARTRV featuring B. Thom Stevenson

Gorilla Cheese NYC

Green Pirate Juice Truck

S’amore NYC

Sherry Truck

Shorty’s On Wheels

Submergedart

Tiffany Nicole Mobile Vintage Shop

Bushwick Open Studios is an open and inclusive event that celebrates this thriving neighborhood by sharing artistic projects and encouraging community interaction and dialogue. BOS brings the neighborhood’s thousands of artists and performers out into the streets and in view of each other, other community residents, and the general public.

Located in an old casket factory steps from the Morgan Ave L, Pine Box Rock Shop offers 16 drafts and impressive specialty drinks, along with a seasonal cocktail menu. In the heart of Bushwick’s arts community, Pine Box hosts many emerging artists, musicians, filmmakers and comedians. Visit the website for monthly events and show times. Weekly Staples: Happy Hour (everyday until 8pm), Trivia Night (Wednesdays @ 8:30), Karaoke (Thursdays @ 10pm), and Televised Events. (Open at 4pm weekdays, 2pm Sat/ Sun.)


Artist We Love: Allie Pohl

Meet Allie Pohl, the next artist to be exhibiting with Art Cart NYC™! Pohl is a Los Angeles based artist who has made a name for herself challenging society’s idolization of the projections of female beauty by transforming a universal symbol of perfection: The Barbie Doll.

Artist’s statement:

My work challenges the social constructs of perfection by holding a mirror up to Western society. We are able to curate our lives through social media allowing the lines between the real and virtual to blur. Social media allows individuals to construct who they want to be and who they want to look like with the “ideal” in mind.  My work deals with projections of perfection, and how this operates in our lives. 

I originally developed “Ideal Woman” by transforming the Barbie doll and digitally enhancing her to be even more perfect by fitting her into the socially constructed ideal female measurements of 36-24-36.  Barbie, an American cultural icon, born in 1959 at the dawn of the Post-War consumer culture, was intended as a toy for young girls, but its ubiquitous presence resulted in a brand representing the idea of female physical perfection. I developed a symbol, the “Ideal Woman” to force the viewer to be aware of the unattainable nature of this “cookie cutter” form that pervades our culture.

As a way to appropriate my message and this symbol into pop culture, I created a line of wearable art, Ideal Woman: Necklace. The necklaces are agents for change:  to question the social constructs of perfection. The necklaces are assembled and packaged with the help of the women of Daybreak.  Daybreak, a Los Angeles based women’s charity and a project of OPCC, a 501(c) non-profit organization, empowers women recovering from mental illness and homelessness to rebuild their lives. A portion of the proceeds from the sale of the necklaces is donated back to Daybreak.

Pohl received a Bachelor of Arts from Hamilton College, attended Parsons for an Associates of Applied Science in graphic design, and received her MFA in Electronic Media Arts & Design from the University of Denver. Pohl has exhibited in galleries and museums in California, Florida, Colorado, and New York. Her art work and branded merchandise have been featured in over 40 publications including USA Today, LIFE Magazine, Marie Claire, Elle, The Orlando Sentinel, The Denver Post, Cool Hunting, and The American Contemporary Art Magazine.

To learn more about Allie the artist, click here, and Allie the jewelry designer, click here.

New year, new look! Check out Truck Yeah&#8217;s new website, with a growing Truck Registry of mobile ventures in NYC and across the country.

New year, new look! Check out Truck Yeah’s new website, with a growing Truck Registry of mobile ventures in NYC and across the country.

Performa 11

Art Cart NYC admires Performa’s biennial for its ability to occupy the entirety of New York City and capture the attention of its inhabitants for a nearly a whole month. It pushes the boundaries of (performance) art in all sorts of media and method, as well as the boundaries of public intervention. Contributor Sophie Cavoulacos shares her highlights from the 2011 event.

This November, the team at Performa has put on a remarkable three weeks of programming, staring off with a bang with Elmgreen & Dragset’s Happy Days in the Art World on November 1st and wrapping up with the Malcom McLaren Award last Monday, which was awarded to Ragnar Kjartansson. The fourth iteration of RoseLee Golberg’s biennial celebrated performance with commissions from both emerging and established artists, and has also been truly interdisciplinary in nature with music, film and visual arts abound. Between the Performa Hub at 233 Mott Street, home the Performa Institute's programs, and collaborations all over the city - from Wu Tsang at the New Museum, Mika Rottenberg and Jon Kessler in Chelsea, Marina Ronsenfeld in Chinatown and many more - Performa has both embodied and revealed the synergy between the arts and the city. It’s impossible to make it to every performance and program (or if it is, that person deserves a prize) but the durational aspect is compelling in its own right - Performa presents itself as a force to be reckoned with, as art you need to make time for, and as an idea that stubbornly lodges itself in your brain. Here’s to an intelligent, thoughtful and undeniably rad few weeks. Already looking forward to what’s to come.

 

Art Cart NYC on the WHITE HOUSE Blog

Art Cart in The Big Apple

Posted by Ronnie Cho on November 09, 2011 at 04:50 PM EST

There are many things that can inspire us. Whether it’s listening to the story of a war veteran, learning about someone who successfully started a company, or reading a speech from historic figures fighting injustice there are so many places to look for inspiration. For many there is one thing they can always rely on to stir imagination and passion - art.

Hannah Flegelman

Hannah Flegelman. (Photo from HelloGiggles)

Most of us do not get the chance to work with artists and art on a daily basis. Many people do not have the time to visit a museum or a gallery during the work week and therefore find themselves craving to reinvigorate their creative juices. This week’s Women Working to Do Good profile of Hannah Flegelman highlights the savvy way she is bringing creativity to the people in the streets of New York City proving that art can be discovered anywhere. Hannah found her inspiration for Art Cart NYC in a very unlikely place:

Food carts were “developing beyond the typical street [carts] you see on Broadway [in NYC]” into sophisticated gourmet restaurants on wheels. “I thought to myself, how great would it be if instead of a food cart, we had an art cart that could gather a following and exhibit art in a similar fashion as the way in which these trucks serve up their fares?” Thus, Art Cart came into being.

Hannah has been described by her classmates as that girl that everyone wants to be friends with and don’t we all want to know what that girl is up to now. Well here is your chance. Check out Hannah’s story from our series withHelloGiggles and get inspired to make change in your community.

“Art is important not only because it is very personal, but it also represents the collective sentiment of a place or group of people at a point in time. Art survives us, and speaks for us—it shows us what we value, what we fear or loathe, and what we envision for the future.”
Art Cart NYC™ Founder Hannah Flegelman featured on HelloGiggles!

“Art is important not only because it is very personal, but it also represents the collective sentiment of a place or group of people at a point in time. Art survives us, and speaks for us—it shows us what we value, what we fear or loathe, and what we envision for the future.”

Art Cart NYC™ Founder Hannah Flegelman featured on HelloGiggles!